IBM Cognitive Computers Detect Skin Cancer Quickly with Visual Machine Learning


International Business Machines (IBM) has announced their partnership with Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre on Cognitive Computer technology to analyze and detect dermatological images of skin lesions so as to help identify the various cancerous disease states as many as 97 percent of the time.

IBM technology after scanning around 3000 images could detect Melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer with an accuracy of about 95 percent as compared to today’s methods which can detect with an accuracy of 75 percent to 84 percent, as per a PC World report.

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Computers with cognitive visual capabilities are being developed at IBM, that will be trained to identify specific features and patterns by gaining experience and knowledge through analysis of large collection of educational research data.

IBM researcher Noel Codella said that the technology has proven to be adept at analysing a large number of images quickly and with a detailed level of measurement than any doctor would do manually. The system evaluates the images in less than a second.

“Given the incredibly high incidence and mortality rate of skin cancer, there’s a real opportunity to have a clear and significant impact on the health and longevity of individuals on a global scale. At IBM, we are uniquely equipped to help tackle this problem with our expertise in cognitive computing, including machine learning and visual analytics,” said Dr. Noel Codella.

Even though cure of fatal diseases like cancer are still not completely evolved, an early detection can increase the chances of the treatments working. A lot many technology companies are working in the healthcare sector these days, each doing its own bit. Google too is working on a project to detect cancer cells in a human body.

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Image Source : Venture Beat