Samaritans Radar: A Twitter App to Identify Users at Suicidal Risk

On Wednesday, a UK-based suicide prevention charity ‘Samaritans’ has released a free app which will keep a close eye on Twitter for signs of people feeling depressed or struggling to cope up with life.

As initially shared by the app will automatically inform their friends and well-wishers about the possible mishap and will also advise them on how to provide support.


Designed by a digital agency called Jam, Samaritans Radar uses a specially designed algorithm to watch tweets for phrases that could indicate a person might be feeling troubled and in need of help. The app scans for tweets involving phrases such as “tired of being alone”, “hate myself”, “depressed”, “help me” and “need someone to talk to”.
The app will instantly send an e-mail to the people who have installed it with the link to the tweet and will also provide tips on what to do next.

To sign up for this service, users need to visit the Samaritans Radar Website and enter their details. After signing up for the service, the radar will start monitoring your Twitter feeds for warning signs and send an e-mail if spotted any.

After the advent of social media, more and more users are freely expressing their views and feelings online. With more than 15 million Twitter users in the UK and an average of 500mn tweets per day globally, Samaritans Radar provides an online safety net, reducing the chances of a person’s call for help being missed.

Patricia Cartes, Twitter’s global head of trust and safety outreach, hailed the Samaritans for “experimenting with new ways of supporting people in the digital space”.

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With a generous motto to help the mankind, Samaritans app perfectly describes themselves with an apt tagline: “Turn your social net into a safety net”. Twitter’s support for the app is a good initiative to help people in need or distress. Through the help of the Samaritans Radar app, users can always extend their helping hand in favor of their friends or colleagues at the time when they needed the most.