Intel forms internet of things division

intelSanta Clara, California based tech giant, Intel, following the footsteps of other tech giants such as Cisco Systems, has recently created a new Internet of Things group.

The new solutions group combines an existing Intel business focused on chips for commercial and industrial devices with Intel’s Wind River subsidiary, which sells software for commercial and industrial devices, says a report by Reuters.

Intel’s new ‘Internet of Things Solutions Group’ will be headed by Doug Davis, general manager, and will report directly to the company’s chief executive, Brian Krzanich.

“Krzanich is saying, ‘I want a higher level of focus on this to help us grow it and put the level of attention on it that it deserves,'” said Davis.

The IoT group will focus mostly on embedded markets including industrial automation, retail, aerospace, and automotive. Intel products for storage and communications systems will remain a part of the company’s datacenter group.

Intel had dominated the desktop, notebook, and server processor markets for long, but it was slow to position itself for the shift from the PC to the post-PC era, thus was overtaken by companies like Qualcomm and Nvidia.

Intel lags behind these players in smartphones and tablets market, but now with this initiative, it’s clear that Intel atleast doesn’t want to be left behind these in the ‘Internet of Things’ market which is expected to generate up to USD 8.9 Tn by the year 2020.

The new group will also create more complete software stacks and platforms for its Atom and Quark SoCs using Wind River, McAfee, and other assets, according to reports.

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“We’re pulling together a couple of pieces that are already doing well and we want to accelerate those efforts. This creates a primary focus around ‘Internet of Things,’ added Davis.

Last month, Krzanich said that the company was working on a new line of ultra-small and ultra-low-power microchips for wearable devices like smartwatches and bracelets, along with an ingestible version for biomedical uses.

To contact the author of this post, email pooja.sareen@wirefootindia.com

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